Archive for May, 2016

Here she is, the Beast! (Another one of her epithets). THE SCARLET COUNTESS, our 28 page pitch for the world’s pre-eminent graphic novel publishers.  You can see too from the end pages we have a lot of people to thank, but authors Sam Robinson Horley and Scott Alexander Young are especially indebted to illustrator Tamás Vári and colorist  Máté Vadas.

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Yes, we are now just waiting for prints of The Scarlet Countess booklet to come back from, who else, but the printers, so we can do our mail-out to the right graphic novel publishers. Meanwhile, another kind of Prince! He is Prince Gábor (Gabriel) Báthory. Nephew of the ‘Scarlet Countess’, and leader of Transylvania at the time of her arrest. Considered by the Báthory clan their last and best hope to place the crown of the Holy Roman Empire on the head of a true Hungarian warrior king. This is another one of Tamás Vári’s wonderful character sketches. Here he is dressed as if in his own quarters. In the panels for the graphic novel however, we get to see Gábor in full plate armor, sitting on a Transylvanian throne. All good things to those who wait…

Prince Gabor

Here she is, illustrator Tamás Vári’s character sketch of Countess Erzsébet (Elizabeth) Báthory, in all her cool, imperious glory. Forget the ‘red woman’, this lady was the real thing. But how much truth is there, to the generally accepted history that Báthory was history’s most prolific serial killer, or the legends which say she bathed in the blood of virgins to prolong her youth?

Well, you will just have to read The Scarlet Countess when it comes out, to ascertain that.

ScarletCountess

What is in no doubt – this was one Hell of a Lady!

The day we were beginning to think would never come is almost upon us. The pitch for The Scarlet Countess is almost ready to be sent off to the big names in graphic novel publishing. It includes a beautifully drawn and colored sample chapter, and poster artwork, but also character sketches: such as the above. Here illustrator Tamás Vári gives us two possible takes, on our Narrator. He’s a troubadour and a lovable scoundrel named Balassi, loosely based on real life, 16th century warrior poet Bálint Balassi. We have decided on the version with the eye patch. What do you think?